About us

Vixen Collective – About Us

WHO WE ARE

Vixen Collective is Victoria’s peer only sex worker organisation.  Through our objectives and work we promote the cultural, legal, human, occupational and civil rights of all sex workers.

Vixen Collective currently receives no government funding and is run by sex workers volunteering our time and energy, in the absence of a government funded peer only sex worker organisation in Victoria.

Vixen Collective is a peer only sex worker organisation – this means that our organisation is made up of current and former sex workers. Peer based sex worker organisations do not allow the owners and operators of sex industry businesses or ancillary staff in the sex industry (people such as managers, receptionists, drivers and cleaners) to participate.

Vixen Collective is the recognised representative peer organisation for sex workers in Victoria, and a member of Scarlet Alliance (Australian Sex Worker Association) the national peak body for sex workers in Australia.

Find out more about Vixen Collective’s current work by visiting:

Our current campaigns for sex worker rights in Victoria here – vixencollective.net/campaigns/

Vixen Collective’s latest work advocating to state and federal government, under ‘Submissions’, here – vixencollective.net/what-we-do/submissions/

The ‘Media Releases’ section of our website here – vixencollective.net/what-we-do/media-releases/

Learn more about ‘What We Do’ here – vixencollective.net/what-we-do/

How Vixen Collective was founded:

Victoria has a proud history of sex worker rights.  With the advent of HIV in the 1980s, Australia led the world by deploying a community-based response – money was given to key communities (sex workers, gay men, injecting drug users, etc.) to form their own organisations to contribute to the fight against the virus.  Melbourne was the first place in the world to commit funding to a sex worker organisation – the Prostitutes Collective of Victoria (PCV).  The PCV were pioneers in sex worker organising.  However, in 2001 the PCV was taken over by a community health service and it ceased being an organisation of sex workers.

It was in this environment of Victoria lacking a sex worker run organisation, that Vixen Collective was formed in 2005. Vixen Collective was started by a group of Victorian sex workers and launched at the 2005 Scarlet Alliance (Australian Sex Workers Association) national forum.   Later gaining membership of Scarlet Alliance in 2007, Vixen Collective has continued to engage in sex worker rights organising, building participation by local sex workers, as well as developing links to state and national sex worker organisations.